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SIX WORD » LIFE

Constructive conscious control counters corrupt kinesthesia.

by Clairee on October 6, 2011   |  FacebooktwitterTumblr


A basic working assumption for F.M. Alexander, founder of the Alexander Technique, notes that the way we register sensory information is debauched. Remember that science-class experiment where you immerse both hands in a bowl of tepid water after the left one had been in cold water and the right one in hot? Turns out that what we feel is conditional. The way to avoid getting tripped up by this faulty sensory appreciation, a.k.a debauched kinesthesia, is to control the way you respond to stimuli. Just going with what feels right at the moment might take you someplace that you never intended to go. A response needs to rely on objective feedback to ensure its appropriateness. This feedback must be consciously sought and then used to plan a constructive course of action. The ability to choose a constructive response in real-time, manifests as poise. There is nothing that I know of other than the Alexander Technique that can teach us how to hone constructive, conscious control. Not only does it counter ‘corrupt’ kinesthesia, it will ultimately awaken our senses and restore a measure of reliability to our natural instincts. And, btw, it’s really fun to practice.

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